Colombe's eerste jubileum blog

A personal history of Volt

Exactly one year ago, we launched Volt (see “The battle for our future”, “Salvation at your doorstep: why we desperately need Volt”). In honour of its first anniversary, let me take you on a short journey retracing the key steps and remembering why we are spending every awaken moment fighting to make this dream a reality.


June 23, 2016: Brexit happened.

No, this was not such a surprise considering the campaign and the situation at hand. However, it was a further blow to a concept - the EU - that is believed to be the best means to achieve peace, security, the highest standard of living, and the respect of human rights, among others (see “a call for Europe”). This came in the context of the rise of populism in the world, the rise of inequalities within and between countries and the rise of hate crimes, among other (see “European Populists and how to Fight them”). For these reasons, Brexit impacted many people more than they thought it would. While complaining over the phone with Andrea about its impact on our lives the morning of the 23rd, he said something that stuck with me: “let’s stop complaining and actually do something that will safeguards what we hold dear.” Yes, sure great idea, but how? 

From this moment onwards, the idea of Volt started to emerge: what about a movement that we would start in a single country, and then grow in others? No, this would not have achieved our aim. What about a European movement? No, because Europe is a means to achieve our aim, but cannot be the sole solution: some local problems need local answers. Slowly, with the help of Damian, we started to move in the direction of a movement that would not only exist at the European level, but also in every country on the European territory, to tackle issues at all levels, use best practices to find real solutions, and actually bring about change. As none of us were politicians, one thing that quickly became clear to us is that we should not only aim at changing Europe and its countries, but also the way politics is done.

However, I was still a bit hesitant. Andrea convinced me by telling me this: “Look, I hope we will succeed, but even if we don’t that is not what matters. What matters is that we lay the groundwork to show that this is feasible, that many different countries can work together for a better future for all, and that we can do politics in a good way.”

Very quickly, some basic concepts and values were laid down that we agreed we would work for and around, including the following:

  • Our aim is to help people, and we shall act accordingly
  • We stand for the respect of human rights, and will not ever compromise on them. This is why human rights are part of our fundamental and foundational values.
  • We will not back down from a fight just because it is unpopular, difficult, or would make us loose votes.
  • We will apply our own principles to ourselves: it is very easy to say that we want government, countries and others to behave in a particular manner, but who are we if we don’t lead by example?
  • We will do this the proper way: we will not play into populist narratives, we will not be an undemocratic movement, we will not be provocative just for the sake of inflaming people, we will not campaign without a programme and strong policies, and so on.

March 29, 2017: the launch and our first year

With the help of a few friends, we launched Volt the day of the triggering of article 50, a year ago. We launched a pan-European progressive movement, present at the European level and in many countries, that wants to revolutionize politics and the way it is done.  Volt is neither left or right, neither conservative or liberal: it goes beyond all those classifications.

That’s our pitch, but what does it actually mean?

  • Pan European: we are pan-European because we aim at being present in every European country, and at the European level: we believe this is the best way to affect change, by being able to tackle issues everywhere and together. This is what makes us unique: we can inspire ourselves from other countries, look for solutions together, collaborate, and come up with the best possible outcomes, for all. We also all come under the Volt umbrella and can set priorities to fight for together.
  • Pro-European: we are a pro-European movement, yes, but that does not mean that we blindly want to move towards a closer Union. We are pro-European while understanding that many aspects of the EU need to be drastically reformed, challenged, and bettered (see our flagship policy “Unite Europe”). For us, Europe is a mean and not an end in itself: our aim is to help, to build on what we have and change what needs to be changed in order to ensure that no one is left behind, that all are guaranteed equal rights and the best standards of living, that we will live in a better world. One of the means to achieve this is, we believe, Europe (as we can see with its track-record). However, it is not the only one.
  • Progressive: we advocate and work for progress, change, and social reforms.
  • Neither left nor right: we use best practices. This means that we will use a model that works as long as the policy respects our fundamental values, that we check how it will impact those who will be the most affected by it, that it is evidenced-based and follows scientific evidence. We don’t want to cluster ourselves in traditional party clans, as it is unfeasible for a movement that is in more than 23 European countries: apart from the fact that we use best practices, one type of classification does not mean the same thing in different countries.

A big part of who we are is the fact that we want to run on a programme. As a pan-European movement, the question was however raised of how to have coherent programmes at all levels (European, national and local). This is what was decided:

  • Policies and programmes are first created at the European level, under our 5+1 challenges. Those are broad guidelines that leave room for adaptation.
  • National chapters translate, adapt, prioritize and if needed create new policies. National policies have to be consistent with European guidelines and with other countries: countries can reach a goal in different ways, but they cannot directly contradict one another.
  • Any policy created at any level has to comply with our fundamental values (mainly the respect of human rights and others), be evidence-based when evidence exists, and have a ‘vulnerability check’ (meaning verifying the impact it would have on the part of the population it would impact the most). Finally, it should follow best-practices when possible: we never pretend we know everything but look at what works, how we can implement it, or whether we need a drastically different solution.
  • All of our policies follow the process we set out as a movement, to ensure that Volters can vote and express their opinion.

All of this is possible thanks to the amazing members we have in our teams: they are from all sectors, all ages, and some are experts in their fields and are at the forefront of change in their professional lives. However, whenever we lacked the competences and expertise to craft certain policies, we held off until we had people with such competences willing to help or join, rather than given an ill-advised response, recognizing that we needed to know more (which is also why we reach out to experts to help and review our policies and use best practices).


29 maart 2018: de toekomst.

Het is nu een jaar geleden dat we Volt lanceerden. Van een 'beweging' van een Italiaan, een Fransman en een Duitser, waar zijn we nu?

  • We bevinden ons nu in meer dan 24 Europese landen, in meer dan 50 steden, onze communiteiten
    niet meegerekend. We hebben meer dan 3000 supporters en 1500 leden. We zijn gestart met een Facebook pagina, we hebben er nu meer dan 20.
  • We hebben de beweging in Luxemburg opgenomen, we zijn een politieke partij in Duitsland geworden en we werken er in alle andere landen aan om hetzelfde te doen.
  • We hadden 3 pan-Europese evenementen (Juli - Milaan; oktober - Berlijn; januari - Boekarest) en zal onze 4e in mei in Parijs hebben. We houden onze eerste ronden van nationale vergaderingen in heel Europa en hebben er meer dan 200 gehouden.
  • Wij begonnen uitgebreid persaandacht te krijgen (hier, hier, hier, hier etc)

Naast deze indrukwekkende aantallen hebben we ons gericht op een gezonde interne structuur, die ons in staat stelt zo democratisch, effectief en rechtvaardig mogelijk te zijn. Hiervoor hebben we onze eerste interne verkiezingen gehouden, gestemd over ons beleid (en dat blijven we doen) en een taskforce in het leven geroepen die het goede voorbeeld geeft en met richtsnoeren en voorstellen komt voor de beweging om ervoor te zorgen dat we onze waarden naleven, dat we inclusief zijn en dat we niet alleen voorstellen doen, maar die ook daadwerkelijk uitvoeren binnen de beweging. Het bestuur van Volt Europa mag bijvoorbeeld geen mensen hebben die dezelfde nationaliteit hebben, en alle drie de bestuursleden mogen niet van hetzelfde geslacht zijn. Daarnaast zijn we bezig met de oprichting van een externe instantie voor conflictoplossing, die tot taak zal hebben claims van ongepast en discriminerend gedrag, geweld en/of seksuele intimidatie te beoordelen, volgens ons beleid "Bridge the Gender Gap", dat pleit voor dergelijke maatregelen op de werkplek.


Dus wat is de volgende stap?

We hebben grote plannen: we willen om te beginnen in mei 2019 in het Europees Parlement worden gekozen, in ten minste zeven landen en met 25 leden van het Europees Parlement, om de eerste onafhankelijke pan-Europese partij te zijn die ooit onafhankelijk is geweest.  Dat betekent niet dat we alleen bij de Europese verkiezingen zullen zijn: we zijn van plan om tegelijkertijd nationale, regionale en lokale verkiezingen te houden. Wij zijn niet van plan om gekozen te worden: wij zijn van mening dat wij als onafhankelijke beweging in staat zullen zijn om echte veranderingen tot stand te brengen en ons programma op een verenigde manier op Europees niveau uit te voeren, terwijl wij hetzelfde doen op nationaal en lokaal niveau.

Terugkijkend op de laatste jaren van het werk aan Volt en na met velen van u te hebben gesproken, blijf ik erop terugkomen dat we niet uit het oog mogen verliezen om welke redenen we dit allemaal doen. Hoe kazig het ook klinkt, de reden is om mensen te helpen en van Europa een betere plek te maken, zo niet de wereld. Met Europa bedoel ik niet de EU, maar elk land, elke regio, elke stad. Ja, we zijn al zoveel gegroeid en hebben veel potentieel, maar wat is het waard als we weer een politieke partij worden die alleen maar honger heeft naar macht en roem? Wat ons maakt is dat we er om geven. Het maakt ons zo veel uit dat duizenden mensen in hun vrije tijd gratis werken om ervoor te zorgen dat er daadwerkelijk iets verandert. Daarom is volt zo uniek en hebben we het op onze evenementen gezien. De reden hiervoor is dat we hier allemaal om dezelfde reden zijn, en we het in eerste instantie misschien niet altijd eens zijn over de middelen om dit te bereiken, maar we het wel eens zijn over het doel. Dit vertaalt zich in de praktijk door altijd tot een compromis te komen en een oplossing te vinden, ondanks het feit dat met meer dan 100 mensen uit meer dan 20 landen, met verschillende achtergronden en leeftijden, uiterst actuele onderwerpen worden besproken. We debatteren, we discussiëren, we zijn het er niet mee eens, maar we vechten niet.

Telkens als ik u allen ontmoet op onze evenementen, kom ik met een enthousiasme, motivatie en hoop die opwindend is (ja, onze naam is heel toepasselijk). Daarvoor wil ik u bedanken en u nog een gunst vragen: verlies nooit deze passie, geef nooit op, vergeet nooit waarom u dit doet.